Michael Lacey Illuminating the Path in Mathematics

Since an early age, Michael Lacey has always had a passion for mathematics. He is a math genius who managed to solve mathematics problems which were previously unsolved; he also came up with various theories. Through his understanding, he always tries to help out those around to simplify the work. Michael was born on September 26, 1959. He obtained his Ph.D. from Illinois University.

While studying for his Ph.D., he worked on probability, Ergodic theory, and harmonic analysis. In his Ph.D. dissertation, he solved the law of the iterated logarithm for empirical formulas. He previously held positions at the Louisiana state university and the University of North Carolina, during his time there he came up with the central limit theory.

He received the Salem prize for solving the conjecture of Alberto Calderon in collaboration with Christoph Thiele. He also won the national science foundation, postdoctoral fellowship, while at the Indiana University. Read more: Michael Lacey | Wikipedia and Michael Lacey | Mathalliance

While trying to help people solve problems he sees them in another perspective. It has enhanced his ability to teach understandably. According to Michael, math’s enhances the ability of one to tackle problems in the right way; by combining his math’s skills and teaching, he has dedicated his career to mathematics.

When not teaching, Michael frees his time by giving public lectures to students on the realization of their careers. Michael is the director of undergraduate education in the mathematics department; he organizes symposiums and seminars and serves as the editor of the math society.

During his career, Michael Lacey has received various awards. The awards won are a result of the impecabble skills evidenced in the different projects that he has partaken in his life.

He got the award of the best mentor in Georgia tech NSF. He has won the Fulbright scholarship from Centro di Georgia Pisa in Italy.

Learn more about Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey:

http://nyjm.albany.edu/j/2017/23-8.html
https://www.genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu/id.php?id=62509